We are very excited to have the support of the Ontario Climate Change Symposium Working Group who have helped in the design of this year’s excellent program.

BEN BRADSHAW, UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH
Ben Bradshaw
Ben Bradshaw is an Associate Professor of Geography at the University of Guelph with expertise in environmental governance. His early research, including his doctoral dissertation, focused on (farm-level) agricultural decision-making in light of external stimuli such as policy reform, price variability, and climatic change. One well-cited paper in Climatic Change challenged the utility of commonly prescribed farm-level climate change adaptations such as crop diversification. While recent research is more varied in focus, he continues to research agri-food sector issues including investigations of the challenges and opportunities posed by climatic change.

 

KIRBY CALVERT, UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH
Kirby Calvert
Raised in the Niagara Region where the rust-belt meets the fruit-belt, Kirby completed his PhD at Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada (2013). Prior to joining the University of Guelph as an Assistant Professor in the Depart of Geography (2015), he worked as Assistant Professor of Geography at The Pennsylvania State University where he was affiliated with the Penn State Institutes of Energy and Environment (2013-2015). Kirby has developed teaching and research program that revolves around two complementary themes: 1) interdisciplinary mixed-method analysis to understand how climate change mitigation efforts – especially renewable energy development and implementation – are (re)shaping land-use systems, environmental governance, and urban-rural relationships; and 2) improving concepts and methods in geo-spatial decision support in order to facilitate and improve the integration of land-use planning and energy planning.

 

SHERI HARPER, UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH
Sheri Harper
Sherilee Harper is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Medicine at the University of Guelph. Her research investigates associations between weather, water, and Indigenous health in the context of climate change, and she collaborates with Indigenous partners to prioritise climate-related health actions, planning, interventions, and research. She is currently a collaborator in an international research initiative called the “Indigenous Health Adaptation to Climate Change” (IHACC) project, which works closely with Indigenous peoples and their organizations in the Canadian Arctic, Ugandan Impenetrable Forest, and the Peruvian Amazon. The project aims to combine science and traditional knowledge to strengthen health systems in light of a rapidly changing climate, within three areas of foci: food security, malaria, and waterborne disease.

 

CRAIG JOHNSON, UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH
Craig Johnson
Craig Johnson is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Guelph. He holds a PdD in International Development from the London School of Economics where his work on environmental degradation and ethnic conflict in southern Thailand explored the conditions under which local communities can establish proprietary rights of access and conservation in common pool resources. His research lies in the field of international development, and concerns the study of urbanization, land and resource governance, and climate change. His principal geographical focus is South and Southeast Asia. Between 2009 and 2013, Craig led an international team that was exploring the socio-economic and environmental implications of urban land acquisition in India, Bangladesh and Vietnam. More recently, he co-edited a book called “The Urban Climate Challenge: Rethinking the Role of Cities in the Global Climate Regime.”

 

PETER LOVE, YORK UNIVERSITY
Peter Love
Peter Love is an experienced and well recognized leader in energy conservation and efficiency and is a respected environmental leader. He has held senior executive positions with a government agency, non-profit advocacy organizations as well as two successful start-up private companies. Over his career, he has played a leading role in fifteen corporate and non- profit boards, serving as Chair of five and President/Executive Director of three. He has also served on six Advisory Boards; current appointments include the National Advisory Committee on Energy Efficiency, Fortis BC’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Advisory Group, the Commercial Building Energy Initiative Leadership Council, Rethink Sustainability, the Greening Greater Toronto Task Force and the Royal Canadian Institute for the Advancement of Science.

 

ERIC MELITON, PARTNERS IN PROJECT GREEN – TORONTO AND REGION CONSERVATION AUTHORITY (TRCA)
Eric Meliton
Eric Meliton is the Project Manager of the Water Stewardship team at Partners in Project Green. His expertise includes industrial and municipal water/wastewater treatment technologies and regulatory compliance for industrial manufacturing practices. Eric served as a North American Environmental Technologies Industry Analyst, assisting companies with competitive business strategies, geographic market insights, and vertical market expansion. Eric is a regular contributor to a variety of water trade publications including: Water Canada, Water Online, Environmental Leader, and Industrial Water World. Facilitating industry support for businesses and their sustainable water initiatives through stakeholder engagement, partnership development, and the execution of corporate social responsibility objectives are his current areas of focus.

 

JOHN SMITHERS, UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH

John Smithers is a Professor of Geography at the University of Guelph. His primary research interests relate to how various types and processes of change are altering rural places and spaces in Canada and elsewhere. Over the past decade, his research has focused on how rural areas generally, and agriculture in particular, have been affected by, and have responded to pressures and processes of change. Specific research foci have included the sensitivity of agricultural systems to changes in either environmental conditions or environmental governance approaches. More recently, John’s research has shifted to understanding how various forces are producing multiple types and trajectories of development in the same rural places and acknowledging that these trends are not always complementary to one another.

DAVE BRAY, ONTARIO MINISTRY OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS

MARK PAJOT, REGION OF PEEL

CHRISTINE TU, ONTARIO CLIMATE CONSORTIUM – TRCA

JOANNE RZADKI, CONSERVATION ONTARIO

RUTH WALDICK, AGRICULTURE AND AGRI-FOOD CANADA